New Orleans Buildings

 

(Click on image for more details.)

St. Charles Hotel
St. Charles St., New Orleans
The 1st St. Charles Hotel was designed by James Gallier in 1835 and completed in 1837. The building burned in 1851.
New Orleans CIty Hall "Gallier Hall"
St. Charles St., New Orleans
Designed by James Gallier, Sr. Construction began in 1845 and completed in 1850.
University of Louisiana
Common St., New Orleans, La.
Designed by James Dakin in 1842. Construction completed in 1848. Became Tulane University in 1884. Demolished.
Tilton Hall, Tulane University
St. Charles Ave., New Orleans
Built in 1901 as the Tilton Memorial Library. Designed by Andry and Bendernagel, architects.
"Snug Harbor" Jazz Club
Frenchmen St., New Orleans
"The classiest jazz club in New Orleans" located in a renovated 1800s storefront located in the Faubourg Marigny.
Antoine's Restaurant
St. Louis St., French Quarter, New Orleans
Antoine's was established in 1840 and moved into the present building in 1868.
Leeds Iron Foundry
Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans
Constructed in 1852 as a warehouse for the foundry. Designed by Gallier, Turpin and Company.
Williams Research Center, HNOC
Chartres St., French Quarter
Built in 1915 as the 2nd City Criminal Court. Designed by Edgar Christy, architect. Became the Williams Research Center in 1996.
Dinwiddie Hall, Tulane University
St. Charles Ave., New Orleans
Built in 1923 as the New Science Building. Designed by Moise Goldstien & Assoc., architects.
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company
Magazine St., New Orleans
Built in 1882 for S. Hernsheim Brothers as the La Belle Creole Cigar Factory.
Parasol's Bar & Restaurant
Opened in 1952 in the old corner store in the Irish Channel neighborhood.
The Arrival of Rex - 1907
Canal St. & the River, New Orleans
The Canal Street Ferry Building with the arrival of Kex (King of Carnival) on Lundi Gras.
Joseph Merrick Jones Hall
St. Charles Ave., New Orleans
Built in 1941as the Howard Tilton Memorial Library. Designed by Moise Goldstein and Assoc. Tulane University
St. Mary's Dominican College
St. Charles Ave., New Orleans
The N.O. Female Dominican Academy was founded in 1861. Greenville Hall was built in 1882.
Maple Leaf Bar
Oak Street, Uptown New Orleans
Houses in the Victorian Oak Street Store, and is one of the longest New Orleans music clubs. (opened in 1974)
Edward McGhee Church
Carondelet St., New Orleans
Built in 1851-1853 for the Methodist Episcopal Church. Became the Masons Scottish Rite Cathedral in 1906.
Pat O'Briens
St. Peter Street, French Quarter
Pat O'Brien's was founded in 1933 and moved into the present 1791 building in the early 1940s.
Richardson Memorial Hall
Canal St., New Orleans
Designed by Thomas Sully, architect in 1893. Named for Tobias G. Richardson. In 1902, renamed Hutchinson Memorial. Demolished.
Florville Foy
North Rampart St., New Orleans
Florville Foy, (a free man of color) marble cutter, sculptor and proprietor of the marble yard on Rampart.
Orleans Cotton Press
Front Street, New Orleans
Built in 1833. Designed by Charles F. Zimple. Burned in 1844 and rebuilt without cupola. Now Demolished.
St. Louis Hotel
St. Louis St., French Quarter
Built in 1841, designed by J.N.B. dePouilly, architect. Became the State Capitol from 1875 to 1882. Demolished in 1915.
Trinity Episcopal Church
Jackson Ave., New Orleans
Built by George Purvis, architect-builder, in 1852-53. The tower was added in 1873 by Charles Hillger, architect.
Tulane Hall, University of Louisiana
University Place, New Orleans
Built in 1857 as the Mechanics Institute and designed by James Gallier, architect. Demolished to make way for the Gruenwald Hotel in 1908. (Roosevelt)
Galatoire's
Bourbon St., French Quarter
Galatoire's was established in 1896. In 1905, they moved to this site, which was Victor's Restaurant.
Southern Yacht Club
Lake Pontchartrain, New Orleans
The 2nd Clubhouse built over the water in 1899. Enlarged in the 1920s and demolished in 1949.
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